Post-Doctoral Fellows

Dani Carrillo

dani.carrillo@berkeley.edu Dani Carrillo is a recent PhD graduate from the Sociology program at UC Berkeley. Her research lies at the intersection of immigration, social welfare, and urban sociology, as she explores how Latinx immigrants access social services in urban and suburban spaces. She will be serving as a post-doctoral researcher with the Psychology and Women’s Studies department at the University of Michigan where she will qualitatively study abortion attitudes across the U.S. Her work has been published in the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies and Social Service Review, and it has been generously funded by the Ford and National Science Foundation.

Lilia Soto

Lsoto1@uwyo.edu I am an associate professor of American Studies and Latina/o Studies at the University of Wyoming with affiliations in the Gender and Women’s Studies Program and International Studies. From a historical and ethnographic position, my research focuses on comparative/relational race and ethnic studies, transnational migration, identity formation and the interconnectedness of time, place, age, gender and sexuality. My first book titled, _Girlhood in the Borderlands: Mexican Teens Caught in the Crossroads of Migration_ (New York: New York University Press, July 2018), couples the temporalities of migration with age, gender, and sex as intersecting categories of analyses and the bearing these have on the lived experiences of Mexican teenage girls raised in transnational families. I have also begun to work on my second research project where I trace the historical silencing of the Mexican presence from the Napa Valley narrative and its rippling effect in present-day Napa. I have been the recipient of the following fellowships and awards: NEH Summer Seminar, the Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship. At the University of Wyoming, I teach courses such as Introduction to Latina/o Studies; U.S. Women of Color; Women, Gender and Migration.